Stephen Moore offers sage advice

Former Wallaby Stephen Moore says looking to others can be rewarding


Sport
Former Wallaby captain won't compare life on the football field to life on the land but believes drawing strength from family, friends and peers may be helpful. Picture: AAP

Former Wallaby captain won't compare life on the football field to life on the land but believes drawing strength from family, friends and peers may be helpful. Picture: AAP

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Finding strength from those nearest and dearest could be one area of help for those on the land who might be struggling, according to Stephen Moore.

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Stephen Moore, the 80th man anointed to captain the Australian Wallabies, knows a thing or two about falling and rebounding.

He once had his jaw smashed in a match, leaving surgeons with little option than to wire his mouth shut for months, and meaning he dined on more than any man's fair share of soup.

In 2014 he was given the captaincy of the Wallabies, following Ben Mowen into the job.

But it was a shortlived tenure, to say the least. Inside the first 20 seconds of the test against France at Brisbane's Suncorp Stadium, Moore was injured and taken from the field, a place to which he did not return for the remainder of the year.

But in 2015 test coach Michael Cheika tapped Moore again, asking him to lead the side to the World Cup as incumbent skipper Michael Hooper stood aside to share deputy duties with Adam Ashley-Cooper.

"It's an honour every time you get to wear the Wallabies jumper, and to be captain is extra special, but ultimately it's what you do with it that is most important," Moore said at the time.

Moore does not subscribe to theoretical arguments he regained the captaincy to complete a job yet to be fulfilled, nor that he was better than the rest.

But he does acknowledge he worked hard to regain his place, backed by the good counsel of family and friends.

He can see some parallels with producers and farmers who might be facing difficulties on the land brought about by forces beyond their control.

"When I was injured it was not in the plan but having a wide circle of support from family to teammates and specialists helped enormously," he said.

"The biggest thing is to take strength from the people around you. If you are in a team you have the opportunity to connect with those people around you and celebrate the wins and console one another over the losses.

"I suspect it could be the same for those on the land. Those farmers who might be doing it tough and worried about certain matters can pull through and see the other side if they tap into those nearest and dearest to them.

"Family and colleagues are always a powerful resource.

"I found in football that finding consistency was a key ingredient. If you can flatten the peaks and fill in the troughs and get to a more even balance in your own performance things can work well.

"I suppose it might be the same on the land. If you can find the right balance and not over-complicate matters the issues can be faced. But I am no expert in this regard and I hasten to add there is a huge difference between sport and real life."

Especially with its peaks and troughs.

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