Australian master's World Cup tick

Thumbs up from Australia's oldest polocrosse player for World Cup

Life & Style
Jim Ramage, centre, Australia's oldest competitive polocrosse player, settles in for some sideline action at the World Cup with Peter Ridgway, Gippsland, Victoria, and Queensland's oldest female player, Brenda Taylor, Arcadia Valley.

Jim Ramage, centre, Australia's oldest competitive polocrosse player, settles in for some sideline action at the World Cup with Peter Ridgway, Gippsland, Victoria, and Queensland's oldest female player, Brenda Taylor, Arcadia Valley.

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Jim Ramage has been to all three polocrosse World Cups that Australia has hosted and he's seen more polocrosse than most people alive.

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Jim Ramage has been to all three polocrosse World Cups that Australia has hosted and he's seen more polocrosse than most people alive.

Now 80 years old, Australia's oldest competitive player was happy to be settled in at the 30 yard line at Warwick last week with his mate Pete Ridgway, up from Gippsland, and Brenda Taylor of the Arcadia Valley, for a birds-eye view of the best polocrosse action happening in the world this year.

Mr Ramage started playing in southern NSW in 1954 and has played for three states at national level in his distinguished career.

"This is another level," he said, when asked to comment on what the Warwick Polocrosse Club had presented to the world for the 2019 World Cup.

"The horses really make it, and the facilities are fantastic."

Last week's event celebrated 80 years of the Australian-born sport and it brought players from eight countries - Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, USA, UK, Ireland, Zambia and Zimbabwe - and all their patriotic supporters, to the turf fields at Morgan Park at Warwick.

It also brought a total of 50,000 spectators to rural Australia's largest-ever international sporting event - attendees saw a New Zealand haka, vuvuzelas from Zambia and Irish supporters at their happiest - and around 12,000 hours of polocrosse watched around the world via the livesteam.

It was what many in Australian polocrosse circles had worked towards for many years, and as far as Mr Ramage was concerned, it worked a treat.

Related: World of faces at World Cup polocrosse

Recovering from having a cancer removed from his eyelid, he could justifiably joke that he was a bit one-eyed at the moment.

As the international travellers return to Africa, the British Isles, across the ditch to New Zealand, and to the US, alongside the long trek many Australian competitors are making back to the other side of Australia, Mr Ramage is getting back into the swing himself.

He caretakes a cattle property and is on a horse most days.

"I stay fit by riding," he said.

It's no wonder polocrosse is a sport for all ages and stages.

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