How minerals are lifting northern Australia’s pregnancy rates

Multimin ‘improves northern pregnancy rates’

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PRODUCTIVITY GAINS: The Multimin Performance Ready Challenge is showing how minerals can lift the pregnancy rates of northern Australian cattle.

PRODUCTIVITY GAINS: The Multimin Performance Ready Challenge is showing how minerals can lift the pregnancy rates of northern Australian cattle.

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The Multimin Performance Ready Challenge is showing how minerals can lift the pregnancy rates of northern Australian cattle.

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IMPROVED pregnancy rates in northern Australian cattle are expected from the Multimin Performance Ready Challenge, a 12-month program run by animal health company Virbac Australia.

The Multimin Performance Ready Challenge gives seven participants the chance to experience first-hand the benefits of Multimin’s trace mineral injection, with assistance from expert mentors.

Challengers received 12 months of free Multimin product and a tailored nutrition program developed by leading industry mentors.

With each challenger sharing their program results and experiences, Charles Darwin University’s Katherine Rural Campus trial site is the latest to take part. Based 16km north of Katherine, the site is managed by Jessica Di Pasquale, Alison Haines and Noah Taylor, who together operate a Brahman stud and Brahman-cross commercial herd from an on-site farm and stud at the university’s training facility.

Dr Amanda Dunn from Katherine Veterinary Care Centre and Jessica Di Pasquale from Charles Darwin University taking part in the Multimin Performance Ready Challenge.

Dr Amanda Dunn from Katherine Veterinary Care Centre and Jessica Di Pasquale from Charles Darwin University taking part in the Multimin Performance Ready Challenge.

Their goals are to increase fertility, conception and productivity and improve immunity and health, under the expert guidance of Multimin mentor Dr Amanda Dunn from Katherine Veterinary Care Centre.

As part of the trial, 92 non-pregnant adult cows were assigned one of two treatment groups at random, and have been given either Multimin or no Multimin (control herd) four weeks before bulls were introduced in November.

In March 2019, all trial animals will be pregnancy-tested, and the resulting data will measure each cow’s pregnancy status, foetus age and animal weight to determine the effect of Multimin trace minerals.

“We’re looking forward to seeing the results,” Jessica said.

“We’ll be sharing our observations over the coming months. Previous field trials have proven that breeders treated with Multimin have significantly higher conception rates earlier in the calving season, we’re expecting to see improved conception at first cycle from these latest trials.”

Multimin for cattle has a balanced ratio of four trace minerals: selenium, copper, manganese and zinc. 

Virbac Australia livestock nutrition product manager Dr Jerry Liu said the Multimin Challenge was an opportunity for producers to learn more about animal nutrition.

“Trace minerals are essential elements for healthy sheep and cattle, and we know that during high demand periods such as joining, weaning and birthing, animals have higher requirements for certain trace minerals,” Dr Liu said.

“This is sure to be a fascinating study into the effects of a new strategic approach for optimal performance management.”

The Multimin Performance Ready Challenge is also part of Virbac’s ongoing commitment to animal health education, with the company supporting students who have a desire to work in agriculture and rural operations in a number of different ways.

Through working with CDU on the Multimin Performance Ready Challenge, the company encourages school leavers to get involved in agriculture and rural operations through agricultural training colleges to become an ag specialist or prepare for jobs in rural and regional sectors.

In addition, WA mentor Enoch Bergman recently gave five young vets from Murdoch University hands-on experience with preg-testing and the chance to learn more about the Multimin Challenge. Virbac also takes in two or three students a year, providing invaluable work experience to help nurture Australia’s next generation of agricultural specialists.

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