Help drought-stricken Queensland farmers protect your food bowl

The Big Dry Drought Appeal spreads to Queensland


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DROUGHT: (Main picture) Sue and Jay Walker, Cumberland, Barcaldine, are one of many producers in Queensland's west coping with ongoing drought conditions. Photo: Sally Cripps. Bottom row l to r: Bare paddocks, Mary and Mac Haig, Alroy, Eulo. Photo: Lucy Kinbacher; Ned Elmy said the best feed for the mob had been between Augathella and Tambo but the pickings were fairly slim on the country they’d just walked over, west of Barcaldine. Photo: Kelly Butterworth; The road to Alroy, Eulo. Photo: Lucy Kinbacher; Some of a 1200-strong mob of Santa cross cattle, mostly weaners, that have spent months walking around Queensland's central west as drought has bitten hard at Corfield. Photo: Kelly Butterworth.

DROUGHT: (Main picture) Sue and Jay Walker, Cumberland, Barcaldine, are one of many producers in Queensland's west coping with ongoing drought conditions. Photo: Sally Cripps. Bottom row l to r: Bare paddocks, Mary and Mac Haig, Alroy, Eulo. Photo: Lucy Kinbacher; Ned Elmy said the best feed for the mob had been between Augathella and Tambo but the pickings were fairly slim on the country they’d just walked over, west of Barcaldine. Photo: Kelly Butterworth; The road to Alroy, Eulo. Photo: Lucy Kinbacher; Some of a 1200-strong mob of Santa cross cattle, mostly weaners, that have spent months walking around Queensland's central west as drought has bitten hard at Corfield. Photo: Kelly Butterworth.

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Everything you need to know about how you can help keep our farmers on the land.

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The custodians of our food bowl are facing unprecedented challenges as they battle unrelenting drought in much of Queensland. 

With 57 per cent of the state suffering from drought – and many finding it hard to put food on their table and keep their stock alive – it’s clear the suburban population need to step in.

Our hard-working farmers need some relief.

Today, Queensland Country Life and North Queensland Register have joined forces with Brisbane radio station 4BC and the Buy A Bale charity to launch The Big Dry Drought Appeal.

It’s an initiative that started in Maitland, NSW, and expanded as drought conditions declined in NSW and awareness of the ongoing drought in Queensland grew.

Take a look at the Queensland drought for yourself

The Queensland appeal will raise money to buy hay, water, fuel for transport and groceries - which will be distributed through gift cards at the farmer’s nominated supermarket. That way, the money will go back into the local economy which also suffers during drought. 

Workplaces can get involved too and collect funds with a donation barrel or help fill a hay truck.

Businesses can sponsor a hay truck and have their banner displayed on the back of the truck. 

Fairfax Media’s Agricultural Publishing managing editor Brad Cooper said supporting the Buy A Bale initiative was a way for Queensland Country Life and the North Queensland Register to give back to the readers they serve.

Every day our journalists, many of whom work and live in communities impacted by drought, tell the heartbreaking stories of producers and their families doing it tough in the face of extreme weather events - Brad Cooper

"Part of our service is to bring attention from key decision makers to the issue, but it's also satisfying that we're able to help in a real and tangible way to deliver immediate help where it is needed most."

Macquarie Media Limited CEO Adam Lang said 4BC had an unparalleled relationship with the metropolitan audience of Brisbane, who were interested, engaged and responsive. 

Many of our programs are also networked regionally and we directly understand the exceptional challenges that are facing many Australians in those communities experiencing drought. They are often the last to ask for help and we know that so many members of our audience want to assist where they can - Adam Lang

“On behalf of our presenters and all staff, we are delighted to partner with Fairfax Media for The Big Dry Drought Appeal to encourage donations for this urgent assistance.”

How can you help?

Donate to buy hay, water and groceries

DROUGHT: 57 per cent of Queensland is suffering from drought. (Top) The road to Alroy, Eulo. Photo: Lucy Kinbacher; (left) bare paddocks in Queensland; (top right) There is no feed in the paddocks; (bottom right) Ned Elmy said the best feed for the mob had been between Augathella and Tambo but the pickings were fairly slim on the country they’d just walked over, west of Barcaldine. Photo: Kelly Butterworth.

DROUGHT: 57 per cent of Queensland is suffering from drought. (Top) The road to Alroy, Eulo. Photo: Lucy Kinbacher; (left) bare paddocks in Queensland; (top right) There is no feed in the paddocks; (bottom right) Ned Elmy said the best feed for the mob had been between Augathella and Tambo but the pickings were fairly slim on the country they’d just walked over, west of Barcaldine. Photo: Kelly Butterworth.

Click here to make a donation that will help buy hay, water and groceries for farmers in need. 

Funds raised for groceries will be used to buy gift cards at the farmer’s local supermarket. That way, the money raised in the Hunter will go back into the region’s economy.

Money put towards water will be spent locally while hay will be sourced from outside the Hunter and transported to farmers because of a lack of supply in the region.

Get involved at work:

Pop money in a barrel, or help fill a hay truck

Take on the challenge at work and see how far you can go. 

Click here to register to receive a donation barrel.

Click here to order a hay truck poster and gradually fill a load of hay for a farmer. 

Sponsor a truck load of hay 

Businesses can also sponsor a truck load of hay. Sponsorship money will flow into the Hunter account and be put towards supplies. 

Click here to sponsor a truck load of hay

Farmers: register here for help 

Click here to register for help from Buy A Bale.

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