OzTech Drones flying amid rainfall

Bundaberg man's innovative drone company enjoys rainfall demand

Agribusiness
26-year-old Jamin Fleming and his fleet of drones

26-year-old Jamin Fleming and his fleet of drones

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Drone business busier than ever after recent rainfall

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Jamin Fleming's Bundaberg based business OzTech Drones has been flying high after recent rainfall saw a need for the innovative technology.

Specialising in agriculture spray drones, OzTech Drones uses the technology to assist properties wherever they can - from painting greenhouses, to minimising chemical contact.

The 26-year-old has had to expand his team to meet the demand - adding two new spray drones to his fleet and hiring two staff members to help with the increased workload.

Raised on a Bucca cattle farm, Jamin said that drone technology provides farmers a more cost-effective solution to crop management, particularly in the wet weather.

"It's too wet for people to get on the crop at the moment, and we can just fly in," he said.

"We've been getting calls asking us to get there now and treat things urgently. It could be a fungus, and the wetter the conditions the faster fungus grows.

"When it's wet, you can't get on there with a tractor and that's where we come in."

"I've been doing something different each day."

Mr Fleming said that drone technology stopped the spread of disease and offered a more precise solution.

"We can get within one centimetre of a problem, rather than spraying the whole crop," he said.

"Instead of damaging crop (with a tractor) to kill weeds, our drones just go over the top and spray down."

What started as a small business is now one of the only companies in the country to be given a swarm license - allowing more than 5 drones in the air at one time.

OzTech Drone being used to paint a green house with a water based UV treatment to reduce heat penetrating.

OzTech Drone being used to paint a green house with a water based UV treatment to reduce heat penetrating.

"We've just purchased another two drones to keep up our swarming," he said.

"Swarming is good for the larger areas, like cattle pastures and spreading granular."

"We spray at a higher concentrate, but we're using less chemical all up and we can be a lot more accurate than other aerial applications."

Mr Fleming said his drone technology also offered an opportunity to farmers to take advantage of the wet conditions.

"When it's raining like this we can also do a lot of seeding, and beneficial bug spreading."

"Rather than wait it out until it's dry we can go in and plant seeds while it's still wet."

READ MORE: 'Explosion' of new software fires up drone uptake

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