South west property owners key to wombat survival

Northern Hairy-Nosed Wombat needs a new home

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It is estimated that there are only 260 Northern Hairy-Nosed Wombats left in the world, making the marsupial critically endangered. Picture: Graham and Linda Lee

It is estimated that there are only 260 Northern Hairy-Nosed Wombats left in the world, making the marsupial critically endangered. Picture: Graham and Linda Lee

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The Wombat Foundation is supporting the Queensland government in the search for landholders in south west Queensland who can create a new home for the Northern Hairy-Nosed Wombat.

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He's graced the covers of a childhood favourite and holds a soft spot in the hearts of many Aussies.

But the Northern Hairy-Nosed Wombat is in danger, with only an estimated 260 left in the world.

The terrifying number, which sees the marsupial on the brink of extinction, has The Wombat Foundation calling for southern Queensland landholders to become wombat warriors by providing a new habitat to help save the critically endangered little fellow.

Currently, the estimated 260 Northern Hairy-Nosed Wombats left in the world all live in two locations in Queensland - Epping Forest National Park, 400 kilometres south west of Mackay, and Richard Underwood Nature Refuge near St George.

The Wombat Foundation is supporting the Queensland government in the search for landholders in south west Queensland who have a suitable habitat, to create a new home for the Northern Hairy-Nosed Wombat.

The Wombat Foundation director Leanne Brosnan said having the wombat in only two locations, poses a great risk.

"The potential of fire, flood and disease could mean all progress in trying to increase the wombat numbers is lost," she said.

A suitable habitat includes deep sandy soil for burrowing in open woodland with Bloodwood and Carbeen trees, surrounded by heavier soils which provide sufficient grass cover for foraging.

Areas of interest within the wombat's former range have been identified by habitat mapping and are located in the Maranoa, Balonne, Western Downs and Goondiwindi Council areas.

"We know landholders recognise the value of biodiversity and we are seeking their help to assure the future of Northern Hairy-Nosed Wombats," Mrs Brosnan said.

"Welcoming an initial visit from the habitat search team to assess the suitability of their property is a first simple step in the search for new habitat for the wombats."

Finding a new habitat to establish colonies will help to secure the survival of the species into the future.

To register interest in being part of this project or for more information please visit The Wombat Foundation website or contact Leanne Brosnan, 0427 598 029, enquiries@wombatfoundation.com.au

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