Rural Aid makes Killarney hay drop

Killarney: Hay delivered to drought affected farming families

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HAY DROP: Rural Aid counsellor Jane McCollum and Queensland Dairyfarmers Organisation state councillor Gary Wenzel.

HAY DROP: Rural Aid counsellor Jane McCollum and Queensland Dairyfarmers Organisation state councillor Gary Wenzel.

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Rural Aid has delivered 128 large bales of hay to 10 drought affected farming families in the Killarney area.

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RURAL Aid has delivered 128 large round bales of hay to 10 drought affected farming families in the Killarney area.

The Killarney hay drop, made possible thanks to the generosity of everyday donors, will assist local farming families struggling to feed livestock.

A further three trailers loaded with 128 bales will be delivered to eight farmers at Palen Creek on July 2.

Rural Aid chief executive John Warlters said the 35.8 tonnes of hay will go a long way to help make life a little easier for the farmers and their families in this drought impacted area.

"Our farmers are going through challenging times," Mr Warlters said.

"They've been impacted by one of the longest droughts in recent history, followed by fires that have devasted the land, people, livestock and homes.

Rural Aid hay arriving at the Killarney dairy farm.

Rural Aid hay arriving at the Killarney dairy farm.

"Now they are dealing with the impact of current restrictions.

"It may not be obvious to all but for many Queensland farmers, still in drought, the impact is very real."

Mr Warlters said in some areas, rain has been received, but would only deliver a short term benefit.

"For others, a lack of rain has meant that restocking or planting a crop isn't an option and, that stock feed is in short supply across winter months," he said.

It may not be obvious to all but for many Queensland farmers, still in drought, the impact is very real. - John Warlters, Rural Aid

The Killarney region was once known for its timber and dairy industries but is now a thriving mixed-farming area, impacted by drought.

"Transport continues to be an essential service during these current restrictions, by leveraging Rural Aid's proven delivery model we are able to continue to support farmers to feed their livestock, thanks to the generosity of our donors," Mr Warlters said.

Two trailers carrying 84 bales of the donated hay went to three farmers at Carneys Creek, just south of Boonah.

Mr Warlters said like many other business working its way through the COVID period, Rural Aid wa continuing to deliver for farmers.

"Week in week out, hay is on the agenda as we help farmers manage through drought and restock after bushfires and floods," Mr Warlters said.

The hay was distributed to Rural Aid registered farmers in the Killarney area.

The hay was distributed to Rural Aid registered farmers in the Killarney area.

Rural Aid was also staying connected with farmers and rural communities through its counselors, and providing financial assistance, as well as the innovative Community Builders Series webinars and On the Couch webinars, he said.

"While uncertainty has been on the peripheral for many, so that our farmers know that they haven't been forgotten during these times, Rural Aid has launched #DearFarmer letters. People can share a digital message of hope with a farmer at www.ruralaid.org.au/dearfarmer/."

At May 1, there were 41 councils (including the Killarney area) and four-part council areas drought declared. These declarations represent 67.4 per cent of Queensland. There are also 28 individual droughted properties in a further 11 Local Government areas.

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