Why Brisbane-based decision making keeps hurting the bush

Regional industries stand up for the bush in Rockhampton

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Queensland Resources Council director external relations Kirby Anderson, Central Queensland University associate vice chancellor Kim Harrington, AgForce general manager projects Andrew Freeman at the annual general meeting of Labor for the Regions Queensland, held in the CFMEU offices in Rockhampton.

Queensland Resources Council director external relations Kirby Anderson, Central Queensland University associate vice chancellor Kim Harrington, AgForce general manager projects Andrew Freeman at the annual general meeting of Labor for the Regions Queensland, held in the CFMEU offices in Rockhampton.

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Brisbane's decision making process is continuing the hurt the bush says key regional industries.

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FARMERS, miners and educators fronted Labor for the Regions Queensland's annual general meeting on Saturday to outline challenges facing industries outside Brisbane.

Representatives from AgForce, Queensland Resources Council and Central Queensland University briefed the Labor regional caucus, chaired by one time agriculture minister Leanne Donaldson.

About 20 people attended the meeting held in the CFMEU offices in Rockhampton.

AgForce is running a social media campaign called #Standup4regqld to draw attention to issues facing rural and regional Queensland.

AgForce is running a social media campaign called #Standup4regqld to draw attention to issues facing rural and regional Queensland.

Each representative was given seven minutes to outline their issues facing the industries and then took questions from the audience.

AgForce's general manager - projects, Andrew Freeman, said the meeting was an opportunity to explain how political decisions made for Brisbane often had deleterious impacts on regional communities, businesses and economies.

"It was made clear at Labor's Rockhampton meeting that the decisions being made based on pressure from single issue organisations were having negative impacts on the regions," Mr Freeman said.

"It not just agriculture that being negatively impacted, it is also mining, education, retail, natural resource management and the environment.

"It's a key consideration that needs to be addressed, and anybody that's seeking to govern Queensland needs to consider."

Mr Freeman said decisions being made in the Brisbane were also discouraging young people from working in the regions because of the negative influence social media was having on their decision making.

"All political parties need to understand Queensland as a whole, and political decisions need to reflect this," he said.

AgForce is currently running a social media campaign called #Standup4regqld to draw attention to issues facing rural and regional Queensland in the run up to the next state election legislated to be held on October 31, 2020.

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