Boonah residents shut national park

Bushfire threat: Boonah residents shut national park

News
Boonah landholders Bruce Wagner, Trinity Cottrell, Brett Nagel, Suzanne Ramsden, Cheryl Jonathan, Robert Staszewski and Hilary Roberts at the entry to the Mount French section of Moogerah Peaks National Park.

Boonah landholders Bruce Wagner, Trinity Cottrell, Brett Nagel, Suzanne Ramsden, Cheryl Jonathan, Robert Staszewski and Hilary Roberts at the entry to the Mount French section of Moogerah Peaks National Park.

Aa

Boonah residents have closed access to a local national park saying the the fire risk is unaccepable.

Aa

BOONAH landholders have closed the access gate to the Mount French section of Moogerah Peaks National Park saying the fire risk remains unacceptable.

The residents - whose seven properties join the national park - say there is a massive fuel load, which will become an inferno potentially destroying both life and property if the tinder dry fuel load is ignited by a stray spark.

National Parks Queensland reopened the park at midnight last night after it was closed for two weeks during Queensland's bushfire crisis.

No access to the Mount French section of Moogerah Peaks National Park.

No access to the Mount French section of Moogerah Peaks National Park.

The 'extreme fire danger' status of the area meant visitors were barred from the park, a ban local residents want in place for at least another two weeks in line with other high risk areas.

Local landholder Brett Nagel said thousands of hectares were at risk if a visitor to the park accidently caused a fire.

"We're not saying anyone would be reckless, but we all know accidents happen," Mr Nagel said.

"Bureaucrats need to have a good think about the implications of people entering and camping in this national park.

"Outside the park, with the total fire ban now lifted, anyone can light a fire less than 2m in diameter.

"This is really a dangerous situation."

Experienced bushfire fighter Bruce Wagner said much of the country had not been burnt for 30 to 60 years.

"The fire here would be worse than what happened at Canungra," Mr Wagner said.

"There is a massive fuel load and the risk of a fire starting is just incredible.

"The department won't take action, so we will. We're not going to allow people's lives and their properties to be put at risk."

Aa

From the front page

Sponsored by