Awareness of industry changes vital

Important industry changes come into effect

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There are some big events coming up as well as changes to important parts of the industry.

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The changes to the lamb definition should be seen as a massive positive to the Queensland industry.

The changes to the lamb definition should be seen as a massive positive to the Queensland industry.

The second half of the year is well and truly under way with some big events coming up as well as changes to important parts of the industry.

Firstly, the MLA has revised the Fit to Load booklet. This booklet should be seen as one of the most important documents for industry. Its focus is clearly set out on the first page. It is a national guide to the pre-transport selection and management of livestock. While we may at times push back against the regulation that we are faced with, an increased focus on best practice will bring better outcomes to the entire supply chain.

Secondly, the changes to the lamb definition should be seen as a massive positive to the Queensland industry. With a lot of Queensland now behind some form of exclusion fence, lamb could once again become a force to be reckoned with. And why not with forward contracts in the southern states currently northwards of $9.80.

The current definition of lamb is 'A female, castrate or entire male that has 0 permanent incisor teeth'. The new definition, which came into effect on July 1, is 'an ovine animal that is under 12 months of age; or does not have any permanent incisor teeth in wear'. This means a lamb is able to cut one or both of its permanent central incisor teeth, as long as they are not in wear.

It is also timely to remind everyone that as of July 1, if you own or keep certain animals in Queensland, you have to be registered as a biosecurity entity. Up-to-date registration allows Biosecurity Queensland to communicate directly with you to ensure quick action in an emergency response. Biosecurity entity registration contributes to the ability to manage biosecurity risks, food safety, market access, and emergency animal disease or pest response capability.

Biosecurity entity registration and the property identification code (PIC) system work together to improve biosecurity. A PIC relates to the land where animals are kept. The biosecurity entity is the person, people or organisation responsible for the day-to-day keeping and care of the animals. The entity is not always the property owner associated with a PIC (e.g. the owner of the animals may be an agistee or lease a property). For further information about biosecurity entity registration contact the Biosecurity Queensland Customer Service Centre on 13 25 23.

Lastly don't forget to nominate your agent for the ALPA Agency Award if they are a marketing specialist or innovator in the field of livestock, property, wool, agronomy, insurance or merchandise. You have until August 16 to put their name forward. The winner is awarded with the Mike Nixon shield of excellence as well as a fully paid for trip to the 2020 Calgary Stampede including accommodation and $1000 in cash courtesy of Australian Community Media and Quadrant Ag tours.

  • Paul Holm is a member of Australian Livestock and Property Agents Association (ALPA).
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