Droughtmaster Australia CEO Neil Donaldson steps down

Droughtmaster Australia CEO Neil Donaldson steps down


Beef Cattle
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Droughtmaster Australia Society CEO Neil Donaldson has left the role.

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Droughtmaster Australia CEO Neil Donaldson has resigned.

Droughtmaster Australia CEO Neil Donaldson has resigned.

Droughtmaster Australia Society CEO Neil Donaldson has left the role after more than 20 years at the helm of the organisation. 

Droughtmaster Stud Breeders' Society president Jeff Williams took to Facebook to share the news with members. 

"It is with great disappointment the Board announces the retirement of our chief executive officer, Neil Donaldson, who has worked tirelessly for the Society for the last 21 years," he wrote. 

"Neil has demonstrated great dedication, loyalty and service to the Society, members and breed. He will be greatly missed and hard to replace.

"Neil has been instrumental in leading the breed  to new heights and for the breed becoming one of the dominant beef breeds in Australia whilst in various roles with the Society. 

"The Board and staff wish Neil and his family all the best in his retirement and intend to recognise his service in the near future. "

Mr Donaldson joined the Droughtmaster Society in 1997 as national operations manager, a role that evolved into that of CEO.

Before joining the society he held various roles in the beef industry, working as a cattle buyer with Australia Meat Holdings, livestock agent with Mactaggarts and later Primac and area manager with CALM, now known as AuctionsPlus. 

He has also worked internationally, spending six years in Papua New Guinea with Primac subsidiary company New Guinea Pastoral Supplies. ​

Michael Flynn, a past president of the society, said Mr Donaldson's extensive industry experience had made him very valuable to the breed over the years.

"He has a CV that's second to none," he said. 

"He's been there, done that in every facet of the industry. 

"He's taken the society from a financially stressed and small breed to the second biggest breed in Queensland."

Mr Flynn said whoever replaced Mr Donaldson would have big shoes to fill. 

"I think he will be sorely missed by the breed," he said. 

"He was so good at the job, he made it look easy."

At the time of publishing, Mr Donaldson was unavailable for comment. 

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