Kingaroy tick meeting vocal

Tick meetings held to review the tick line not the framework


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Joe Jessen, one of the founding members of the Kingaroy, Wondai, Proston Tick Eradication Committee, says the tick line is unsustainable.

Joe Jessen, one of the founding members of the Kingaroy, Wondai, Proston Tick Eradication Committee, says the tick line is unsustainable.

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A series of tick line meetings have been held in southern Queensland.

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​Beef producers have been vocal at the combined AgForce  and Biosecurity Queensland tick line meetings held across southern Queensland in recent days.

In all, about 260 concerned producers attended meetings at Mitchell, Injune, Taroom, Proston, and Durong last week, followed by Kingaroy and Yarraman on Monday.

The meetings were held in response to the changes to the Biosecurity tick line review in 2016, with the then Agricultural Minister, who promised it would be reviewed in two years. 

Current Agricultural Minister, Mark Furner, said he was happy to review the tick line, but not the framework and regulations. 

David McNab, Industry Liaison and Engagement Officer, Biosecurity Queensland, gives an overview of the Biosecurity Act.

David McNab, Industry Liaison and Engagement Officer, Biosecurity Queensland, gives an overview of the Biosecurity Act.

“The information accumulated through the review will inform the sustainability of the tick line, the best buffer, all with the least amount of additional resources or costs,” Mr Furner said. 

Biosecurity industry liaison and engagement officer, David McNab, presented a 45 minute overview telling producers that there are 184 tick-infested properties in the free zone.

About 23 concerned beef produces at the Kingaroy meeting sent a strong message to Biosecurity Queensland that the current tick line in the South Burnett Region was clearly not working. 

Producers were told by Biosecurity Queensland that it wants to ensure a sustainable buffer on the tick line, but as this review is at the end of the second tick season, it would need more time, and a review was needed at the end another tick season, possibly this time next year.  

“The environment is the driver of the survival of ticks in the South Burnett Region,” said David McNab, industry liaison and engagement officer, animal biosecurity and welfare, Biosecurity Queensland.

Local cattleman, Joe Jessen said the tick line was unsustainable and a buffer zone was needed. 

Murgon beef producer, David Harch, Denarlo Brahmans, Wondai, said producers needed to have a sustainable tick line. 

“In my view you cannot have constant outbreaks on an unsustainable tick line,” Mr Harch said.

“The current tick line needs to be moved to a double fenced main road.”

Mr Harsh said he has lived near Wondai for the past 25 years and there have been constant outbreaks near the forestry country. 

“Most producers try to do the right thing, but the cost of chemical involved is not sustainable on a proven unsustainable tick line,” he said. 

“Personally I support Biosecurity and the Department of Agriculture and if the tick line is moved into a more substantial buffer it will be a lot easier to manage.” 

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