Deep ripping improves yields, lower costs

Deep ripping adds to slashed costs


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The Agrowplow AP91 has a single row of shallow leading tynes working at depths of up to 45cm ahead of following tynes which penetrate to 60cm.

The Agrowplow AP91 has a single row of shallow leading tynes working at depths of up to 45cm ahead of following tynes which penetrate to 60cm.

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New Agrowplow deep ripper slashes fuel costs adds to yield

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The new Agrowplow AP91 deep ripper will save fuel and time and boost crop yields, according to company principal Shannon McNab.

A new shank assembly design, shallow leading tynes and wide wing points correspond with studies showing the benefits of deep ripping from 35 centimetres to 50cm down.

Deep ripping lasts up to three seasons, and up to 10 seasons on controlled traffic operations in light sand by shattering hard-pans, allowing moisture penetration and roots to access minerals, moisture and nutrients as well as benefiting microbiology.

“With the AP91 we feel we have a product with a lot of modern features not available on other ploughs,” Mr McNab said.

The machine features a single row of shallow leading tynes working in-line and ahead at depths of up to 45cm to reduce draft required by the following tynes which penetrate to 60cm.

Research shows the system reduces power needed by up to 18 per cent.

AP91 models are available in six to 12 metre widths and require a minimum 220 kilowatt tractor and up to more than 450kW, depending on the soil type.

The innovative shank assembly design features a scissor action and full frame height shank extension.

If the shank hits an obstacle it can’t destroy, the shank breaks back until level with the frame assembly.

AP91 models feature a new level lift system and wings able to float up 20 degrees or down 10 degrees to follow contours.

Wide wing points are an option with the new No.9 shank assembly to produce a more complete fracturing.

The clip-on blade system allows speedy fitting or replacement of the tyne tips with clips behind the boots to hold them in place

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