Brophy boxer 'The Beaver' shares her bush tucker with all

When the Beaver isn't dominating Brophy's boxing tent, she's sharing bush recipes

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In the midst of the pandemic the Beaver launched the Facebook page Streetwise Adventures with her business partner Abbey Douglas, who she first met as an opponent in Brophy's tent.

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Bush tucker isn't just food made in the bush, it's food that has authentic Australian character, so says Bretlyn 'Beaver' Neal.

And the only thing more Aussie than bush tucker, is the Beaver herself.

Last week, the Beaver notched her 240 win inside the infamous Brophy Boxing Tent - the last travelling boxing tent in the world.

This week, she is back in Birdsville filling the labour void left by backpackers and continuing her community work as a tour guide, Indigenous youth advocate, politician and her perhaps her favourite role of them all - an outback chef.

In the midst of the pandemic the Beaver launched the Facebook page Streetwise Adventures with her business partner Abbey Douglas, who she first met across the ring as an opponent in Brophy's tent.

The page - appropriately - features the duos outback adventures that include unique recipes that are all cooked with a few simple rules; cheap and outside.

Beaver ringing the bell of Brophy's boxing tent.

Beaver ringing the bell of Brophy's boxing tent.

Scraping the grease off community barbecues or igniting a campfire on a boat - the Beaver shares her simple recipes, creating delicious meals, often with a beer in hand.

The short videos cut to the chase, Beaver said the pair know their roles.

"Abby's the food taster because she loves to eat and I am the cook because I love to cook," Beaver said.

Beaver - a former jillaroo - said good food doesn't have to be expensive to be delicious.

"I don't think people realise how cost effective you can make food," she said.

"One of my my go to bush tucker camp oven cooks is the twice baked potato. A potato costs you 10 cents, all you have to do is add some bacon and some cheese and bake it twice and you've got yourself a great meal."

Beaver said she was inspired to share her easy recipes after the pandemic hit and tens of thousands of people lost their jobs overnight.

"In the pandemic a lot of people struggled with getting work and I wanted to show how make a cost effective meal," she said.

"It's easy to use the same ingredients for two or three days to create different meals. Sometimes I can feed 15 people for $20 bucks."

"We figured that we would help people as best we can and when you've got city slickers in the office, and all they get to see of the outback is some larrikins cooking a good feed on a on a campfire it might inspire them to reconnect with the outdoors."

Follow the pair on Facebook to keep up to date with their next adventure.

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