Pain relief delivering increased productivity | Video

Pain relief delivering increased productivity

Beef
The use of pain relief on calves is resulting in a direct increase in productivity, says Andrew Melville, Ram Station, Dungog.

The use of pain relief on calves is resulting in a direct increase in productivity, says Andrew Melville, Ram Station, Dungog.

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Upper Hunter Valley beef producer Andrew Melville says the use of pain relief is increasing productivity.

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UPPER Hunter Valley beef cattle producer Andrew Melville says the use of pain relief on calves is resulting in a direct increase in productivity.

Mr Melville, who manages the 2400 hectare Ram Station near Dungog, NSW, said he had been using Tri-Solfen with great success.

"We've been very happy with the results we've been getting," Mr Melville said.

"We've noticed the day after branding the calves are out grazing with the cows and not sitting under a tree sulking and in pain.

Tri-Solfen has been used with great success on Ram Station, Dungog.

"They seem to be more mobile and out their with their mothers."

Mr Melville said to test his observations, a trial involving two mobs of 12 steers was conducted last year.

When the calves were brought in 26 days later for their five-in-one booster vaccination the 24 trial calves were again weighed.

On average the calves treated with Tri-Solfen weighed a kilogram/head more than the untreated calves.

"Here at Ram Station Tri-Solfen has definitely provided a answer for us for the health care of our calves at marking time," Mr Melville said.

"The improvement in their health in the 24 to 48 hours afterwards is quite noticeable.

The improvement in their health in the 24 to 48 hours afterwards is quite noticeable. - Andrew Melville, Ram Station, Dungog, NSW.

"I would definitely recommend Tri-Solfen to other producers because it is a product that definitely works."

Ram Station runs 500 Brangus cows and about 100 trade cows during the year, depending on seasonal conditions.

The operation also involved three properties in the Coolah district, which is located in the central western NSW, about three hours to the west of Dungog.

The properties cover a combined about 1200ha and include the use of crops to grow out the coastal bred weaners.

On average the trial calves treated with Tri-Solfen on Ram Station weighed a kilogram/head more than the untreated calves.

On average the trial calves treated with Tri-Solfen on Ram Station weighed a kilogram/head more than the untreated calves.

The EU accredited Ram Station targets MSA specifications to achieve carcase performance premiums.

The use of Tri-Solfen has become increasingly common throughout the Australian livestock industry.

The distinctive blue gel contains two local anaesthetics - lignocane and bupivivaine - plus adrenalin to stop bleeding and an antiseptic to prevent infection.

Tri-Solfen is applied using an applicator gun, which was recently upgraded to increase the effectiveness of applications.

The cost of Tri-Solfen is estimated at about $1.50/head across a mob of calves, depending of amount applied.

More reading: 'Spencer: Pain relief 'essential' for cattle'.

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