Wool industry wants the truth told to customers

Wool industry wants the truth told to customers

Livestock
NOTHING TO HIDE: Australia's wool industry wants the world to know its product can be trusted as ethically and sustainably produced.

NOTHING TO HIDE: Australia's wool industry wants the world to know its product can be trusted as ethically and sustainably produced.

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Australian growers believe "telling the truth" to environmentally savvy customers about wool will help spur a resurgence in sales.

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Australian growers believe "telling the truth" to environmentally savvy customers about wool will help spur a resurgence in sales.

Growers on Thursday night launched the "Trust in Australian Wool" campaign which they say is a long overdue push to outline their credentials.

They believe Australia's sheep industry is also well poised to help save the planet, an increasing focus of consumers.

"We look after the land, we look after our sheep and we can prove it," WoolProducers Australia president Ed Storey said.

Mr Storey said wool was ethically and sustainably produced and customers should be told about it.

Wool faces fierce competition in overseas markets from synthetic fibres which can offer a distorted view of their own global footprint, the industry believes.

Australian woolgrowers are also responding to an intense focus on animal welfare issues as well, notably mulesing but also tail docking and castration.

"What we have to be is honest and declare it, be transparent," Mr Storey said.

WoolProducers Australia president Ed Storey says the industry can be proud of its credentials on the world's stage.

WoolProducers Australia president Ed Storey says the industry can be proud of its credentials on the world's stage.

WPA has teamed with Animal Health Australia to share "the success story" of Australian wool with the world, through the launch of a new handbook.

Mr Storey estimates the total campaign will cost around $100,000.

The handbook explains how the Australian wool industry has evolved to produce the best quality wool in the world, WPA chief executive Jo Hall said.

"Australian wool is the wool of choice for fine apparel and luxury garments; sought after by all processing nations due to its renowned quality," said Ms Hall.

"Underpinning this popularity are the world-leading practices our woolgrowers use on-farm, every day, along with state and national frameworks, quality assurance systems and innovations.

"This handbook outlines how all of these elements work together to produce Aussie wool - a natural, sustainable product that is recognised globally for its excellence and quality."

This handbook has already been translated into Mandarin and Hindi to reach key importers.

It contains information on sheep health, welfare and biosecurity practices, as well as sustainability and traceability processes.

The handbook is available at www.trustinaustralianwool.com.au.

The campaign will also be promoted on the social media platforms.

This week's launch included Charles Sturt University's Professor Bruce Allworth who spoke of the impending launch of the Sheep Sustainability Framework to further lay out publicly the industry's credentials.

Livestock Logic's Dr Andrew Whale and AWEX SustainaWOOL program manager Dr Paul Swan also spoke.

Mr Storey said the handbook, and the Sheep Sustainability Framework to come, put woolgrowers on the front foot.

"We are not perfect in some areas, we acknowledge that but we are also happy to talk about it."

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The story Wool industry wants the truth told to customers first appeared on Farm Online.

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