Hands-on training for next crop of scientists

Hands-on training for next crop of scientists

Cropping
A group of University of Southern Queensland students took part in a three-day residential school in the Toowoomba region.

A group of University of Southern Queensland students took part in a three-day residential school in the Toowoomba region.

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The next crop of plant agricultural science students had the chance to develop their practical skills at a three-day residential school in the Toowoomba region.

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The next crop of plant agricultural science students had the chance to develop their practical skills at a three-day residential school in the Toowoomba region.

The University of Southern Queensland students are completing a course in plant breeding that covers a range of contemporary approaches to plant improvement, including new applications of biotechnology.

USQ Professor Grant Daggard said there has been rising demand for the course, which was a real nod to the growth being witnessed in the industry.

"We're seeing a renewed interest in the regions - the job opportunities for agricultural workers are constantly increasing, which is attracting a larger student base for courses like ours," he said.

"The demand for food will only continue to grow and the training we provide our students will set them up to contribute to our country in a really meaningful way."

Pacific Seeds canola crop research lead Dr David Tabah says Australia is well placed to meet the growing demand for food.

Pacific Seeds canola crop research lead Dr David Tabah says Australia is well placed to meet the growing demand for food.

As part of the experience, students were able to spend time at Pacific Seeds' world class breeding facility in Gatton.

Pacific Seeds canola crop research lead Dr David Tabah said it was great to be a part of training the next generation of agricultural scientists.

"Growing demand for food as well as a changing climate present new challenges every day farmers and the agricultural sector," Dr Tabah said.

"But with an enthusiastic new generation of young people entering the industry, we believe that Australia is well placed to meet these challenges head on."

The students are completing a course in plant breeding and visited Pacific Seeds' Gatton facility for further training.

The students are completing a course in plant breeding and visited Pacific Seeds' Gatton facility for further training.

Changes to university fees mean agriculture subjects will be up to 62 per cent cheaper, which may attract more students to degrees like plant agricultural science.

"Having a pipeline of trained people is critical for Australia, this industry plays such an important role in our economy and our cultural identity," Dr Daggard said.

"It's amazing to witness the growth of the next generation of agriculture."

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