Demand for genetics soaring

Queensland bull sales setting records for averages and top prices

Beef
Keen eye: Bid spotters working the crowd at last week's Yarrawonga and Waco Santa Gertrudis sale.

Keen eye: Bid spotters working the crowd at last week's Yarrawonga and Waco Santa Gertrudis sale.

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Queensland's stud market is a reflection of the years of hard work by seedstock producers to improve genetics.

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"A week for records" was how Elders Queensland and NT livestock manager Paul Holm described Queensland's bouyant cattle market over the past week.

The price records weren't limited to store sales, with new benchmarks being set in the stud arena as well.

Mr Holm said stud averages were likely to be up at least 30 per cent on 2019.

"It is pretty reflective of the commercial cattle market," he said.

"I think what we are seeing is producers are taking some of the extra money they are getting for their commercial cattle and putting it back into their herds."

Friday's Palgrove Charolais and Ultrablack sale was a prime example, with new record average prices recorded for both breeds.

Their Charolais draft averaged $19,766 to beat the previous record, also held by Palgrove, of $13,530 in 2006. The Ultrablack average was up $10,000 on 2019, finishing up at $16,727.

Santa Gertrudis breeders have also witnessed an uptick, with the Bassingthwaighte families recording an increase in averages of just shy of $3000 during the Yarrawonga and Waco sale.

Vendors putting in the extra effort to produce pre-sale videos was also paying off, as evidenced by the $110,000 sale of Waco Q384 (PS) to Rob and Lorraine Sinnamon, Yulgilbar Pastoral Company, Baryulgil, NSW.

Mr Sinnamon said they were not originally planning to attend, until they "saw the video online and decided it was worth coming to have a look".

Mr Holm said the industry was experiencing an increase in usage of online bidding platforms, with producers concerned about travelling and challenges posed by border restrictions.

"It can be time consuming for them but I think it is well worth it once you see the results," Mr Holm said.

"The difference between a good video and a poor video is very evident when the bidding happens."

Mr Holm said when it came to bulls heading north, any genetic improvement was always good for the cattle market.

"We probably have to get past how many head we run and focus on the amount of kilos we are producing per acre or per square kilometre," Mr Holm said.

"When we weigh cattle, we are counting the number of head but we are really only looking for the kilos in the end."

Mr Holm said he suspected things would continue along the same path and the market reflected the years of hard work by seedstock producers to improve genetics.

"Brahman Week is generally a strong reflection of how the job's going, and with a big weather system possibly coming through Queensland in next 10 days, it could be even more buoyant if that is humanly possible."

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