Bollon breathes sigh of flood relief

Wallam Creek levee bank survives its first test at Bollon

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Tony Steer and Amy Brown survey the Wallam Creek floodwaters from the security of Bollon's levee bank. Pictures - Rebecca Steer.

Tony Steer and Amy Brown survey the Wallam Creek floodwaters from the security of Bollon's levee bank. Pictures - Rebecca Steer.

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The levee built to protect the community of Bollon after the damaging floods of 2010 and 2012 has survived its first test, much to the relief of locals.

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The levee built to protect the community of Bollon after the damaging floods of 2010 and 2012 has survived its first test, much to the relief of locals.

At the same time, graziers to the north and south of town have measured varying degrees of rain from the system that closed roads throughout the south west this week, and have prepared themselves for being cut off by extended flooding for the first time in years.

The lack of big rain in the immediate Bollon region meant the township "dodged a bullet" in the words of Balonne Shire Council representative Michael Nancarrow.

"The last time, we had 10 inches of rain and floodwater on top of that," he said.

Levee gates were erected at the eastern and western entrances to Bollon on Tuesday morning and Wallam Creek peaked at 1.35m on Tuesday night.

Related: Balonne River peaks at St George

Described by the Bureau of Meteorology as major flooding, the level sat at 1.13m on Thursday morning but was expected to fall below the major level of 1m on Thursday evening, and remain above moderate levels of 0.7m into the weekend.

"Everything held up well; it gave the bottom of the levee a good test," Mr Nancarrow said. "Everyone's happy and we're all dry."

One of the levee gates constructed at Bollon in preparation for the oncoming flood.

One of the levee gates constructed at Bollon in preparation for the oncoming flood.

Without the levee, constructed in 2015, he said the town would have definitely experienced flooding.

They have been resupplied by the SES from St George, using a boat to drop off supplies for the Bollon cafe, the medical clinic and the primary school, where the influx of sandflies is the main concern.

One of the town's residents, Bec Steer has been teaching her high school age child at home this week thanks to the road to the secondary school at Dirranbandi being closed.

"We're well and truly cut off," she said. "And by the time we can cross here, the water will be up at Dirranbandi."

Wallam Creek sources its water from the Mitchell area while Mungallala Creek receives flows from around Charleville and the Nebine River.

"It's been quite a time between drinks," Ms Steer said.

According to the BoM, no significant rainfall has been recorded or is expected over the next few days in the region.

Another view of the levee bank successfully holding back the Wallam Creek flood at Bollon, its first test since its construction in 2015.

Another view of the levee bank successfully holding back the Wallam Creek flood at Bollon, its first test since its construction in 2015.

Further west, in the Warrego River basin, major flood levels peaked at Bakers Bend just downstream of Charleville on Wednesday, while major flood levels were developing downstream to the NSW border.

The Warrego River at Bakers Bend peaked at 9.36 metres around 3 am Wednesday and was at 8.86 metres (moderate flood) on Thursday morning and falling.

The river at Bakers Bend is likely to remain above the moderate flood level (7m) into the weekend.

On Thursday morning the Warrego River at Charleville was 3.72m (below minor level) and falling.

At Wyandra the river was at 8.85 metres, a moderate flood and steady near peak level, while at Cunnamulla Bridge it was at 6m and steady.

It is likely to exceed major flood level of 8m late on Friday morning.

The bureau said peak predictions would be made once upstream peaks have been observed.

Moderate to major flood levels were continuing in the Langlo and Ward Rivers during Thursday morning with levels at Binnowee expected to remain high for the next few days as flood waters slowly ease.

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