Audrey looks for a quieter life in retirement

Country stalwart Audrey Edgar is heading to the city after more than 60 years on the land


Beef
Nephews Jeff Edgar, John McLean and David McLean helped celebrate Audrey Edgar's retirement after she spent more than 60 years on the land.

Nephews Jeff Edgar, John McLean and David McLean helped celebrate Audrey Edgar's retirement after she spent more than 60 years on the land.

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Audrey Edgar, her late husband Doug, and his brothers were among the biggest landowners in country Queensland but she has decided to retire to Rockhampton

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AUDREY Edgar has retired after a lifetime on the land, leaving to the echoes of applause from cattle and Quarter Horse producers.

Her nephew Jeff Edgar and his wife Linda, Craigilee, Morinish, helped celebrate her retirement with a colossal gathering of family and friends eager to extend their best wishes and recount the past.

Mrs Edgar moved to the district decades ago after marrying.

She and her late husband Doug first settled on Rookwood, Gogango, then moved to the family property Craiglee before buying Armagh, where she has spent the past 60 years.

For years they were heavily involved with the Braford Association and Mr Edgar was also a founding member of the Quarter Horse Association in central Queensland.

Mrs Edgar said she felt "overwhelmed" by the number of well-wishers who stopped by for the party, including two great-great nieces.

Ruth Whyte said her auntie shared roles with her late husband in their beef producing business.

"They battled the elements of droughts and floods all of which she meticulously documented for future referencing," Mrs Whyte said.

"The love of their land and maintaining the fine line of cattle they had established was their number one priority.

"However, as Doug was a fine horseman, they spent many happy times at campdrafts and later at Quarter Horse cutting events.

"It is of her late husband's successes and passion for his horses that Audrey is most proud.

"Over the years Audrey's strength of character and resilience have assisted in meeting the challenges of country life and it is with the same determination and acceptance of her present situation that she is adapting to the comforts and socialisation of city life.

"Feeling now that she may have passed her 'use by date', Audrey has handed over her daily chore of poisoning rubber-vine on to the younger generation."

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