Gelding case 'may set livestock precedent'

Gelding case 'may set livestock precedent'


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Producers have been warned that a court case involving the gelding of a horse could set a precedent for all livestock industries.

Producers have been warned that a court case involving the gelding of a horse could set a precedent for all livestock industries.

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Producers have been warned that a case involving the gelding of a horse could set a precedent for all livestock industries.

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THE solicitor engaged to defend a Queensland race horse breeder facing animal cruelty charges over the gelding of a horse says a guilty verdict could have far reaching implications for all livestock industries.

Peter Boyce from Butler McDermott Lawyers in Nambour said it appeared the prosecution would allege that any castrations of any animal under the Animal Care and Protection Act 2001 should be performed by a veterinary surgeon and that anesthetic should be provided to the animal.

The Queensland Racing Crime Squad charged Stanley Morris Johnston, 69, and trainer John Charles Pointon, 72, following a joint investigation with the Queensland Racing Integrity Commission, Integrity Investigations Team and Principal Veterinarian.

"The charging of Mr Johnston and Mr Pointon is a challenge for all livestock owners about whether it is appropriate to castrate any livestock without using the services of a vet," Mr Boyce said.

"This has far reaching consequences and we believe it could well be a precedent case.

"We can only imagine the various livestocks such as cattle, sheep or pigs to which this legislation will apply.

"We think the industry should be very concerned about this process."

The case has been set down for a three day hearing in Rockhampton in September.

Both Mr Johnston and Mr Pointon have strenuously denied the charges, saying sedatives and pain relief was provided.

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