Sow with a water jet

Littleproud announces Aqua-Till funded through government initiative


Machinery
CUTTING THROUGH: South Australian No-Till Farmers Association (SANTFA), research and development manager, Greg Butler speaking at the Grains Research Development Corporation (GRDC) Grain Research Update held at Goondiwindi about the development of the Aqua-Till liquid coulter.

CUTTING THROUGH: South Australian No-Till Farmers Association (SANTFA), research and development manager, Greg Butler speaking at the Grains Research Development Corporation (GRDC) Grain Research Update held at Goondiwindi about the development of the Aqua-Till liquid coulter.

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Government announces funding for Aqua-Till nationally

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An innovative liquid tillage system developed by South Australian farmers is set to be trialled nationally with the announcement of $768,500 in project funding from the government.

Using water under ultra high-pressure, the AquaTill water jet acts as a liquid coulter, slicing through stubble, allowing seeding through the highest of retained stubble loads.

The funding will allow inventors, the South Australian No-Till Farming Association, to test the technology across Australia in various crops, including cereals, sugarcane and cotton.

Read more: Using water to slice through stubble

Minister for Agriculture, David Littleproud announced the project had received funding through the government's Landcare Community Capacity fund, along with investment through the Smart Farms initiative, prior to the government entering caretaker mode.

Speaking at Murray Bridge SA today, Minister Littleproud said farmers could soon be saving soil, time and money with the Liberal and Nationals Government investment into efficient planting technology.

"This keeps valuable water and nutrients in the soil," he said.

"This means farmers don't dig up the land which will keep the soil intact and maintain ground cover.

"Retaining soil moisture will be more and more important in the future, every drop of water counts."

Minister Littleproud said by increasing the adoption of stubble retention and no-till farming, the technology could have significant environmental benefits across cropping areas.

"This also has big environmental benefits in places like Northern Queensland where reducing runoff can help protect the Great Barrier Reef," he said.

"The project will be developed across all six states with farmers, peak bodies and industry professionals sharing their experiences and knowledge."

Minister Littleproud said the technology could also facilitate no-till farming systems that increased the productivity of farmers.

"This technology will give crops the best chance of success leading to higher yields in both good and dry seasons," he said.

Minister Littleproud said interest had already expressed from producers in Goondiwindi, Moree, Narrabri, Narromine and Spring Ridge, following the technologies introduction at the Grains Research Development Corporation Updates held earlier this year. .

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