Anzac spirit evident in Aussies' support for devastated graziers

Anzac spirit evident in Aussies' support for devastated graziers


News
Aa

The response of the nation to the devastating floods in north Queensland in February showed the Anzac spirit is alive and well.

Aa

There is no more appropriate time than the 100th anniversary of the end of the "war to end all wars" to reflect on what it means to be Australian.

For more than a century, everyday Aussies have offered their lives to protect the ideals that characterise and define our nation - social equity, a fair go, compassion, and above all, mateship.

Our Diggers fought to preserve a way of life that remains unique.

The response of the nation to the devastating floods in north Queensland in February showed the Anzac spirit is alive and well.

The first donations from Australian families were committed within hours of the news that welcome rains had turned to tragedy, and the pool of funds had grown to millions of dollars within days.

The same week, a convoy of trucks carrying donated hay bales was dispatched to Cloncurry, saving unknown thousands of head.

Thousands of people took annual leave to travel to the region to lend a helping hand, and continue to do so.

And nowhere was this spirit more obvious than from within the primary industries.

Producers who hadn't seen rain in years unselfishly donated cash, fuel, machinery, labour and fodder to help colleagues who had lost almost everything.

The spirit was emphasised by Prime Minister Scott Morrison's visit to the region to promise the nation's support to help them rebuild. The state government's response was equally swift and welcome.

The recovery of the North Queensland cattle industry will take years, but its foundation was begun in the immediate generosity and support of average Australian families, and for that our industry remains immensely thankful.

One of the most welcome effects was proof that we weren't alone, that Australia had our backs, that people in the cities do respect and value their cousins on the land.

That was a powerful message, and one that sometimes gets lost in the current landscape of ever-increasing government red tape and rampant animal activists invading our farms.

I like to think that our Diggers, alive and passed, would be proud to know that the ideals that they fought for remain as vibrant and powerful as when they stormed the steep, stony beaches of Gallipoli in 1915.

These principles continue to inspire and drive our nation to greatness.

This Anzac Day, may we all cherish this wonderful legacy.

Aa

From the front page

Sponsored by