Flooded producers urged to watch out for ‘mongrel weeds’

North west floods 2019: Expert urges vigilance to combat weeds spreading

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An invasive species expert has warned producers to keep an eye on the spread of prickly acacia following massive floods. Photo: DAF

An invasive species expert has warned producers to keep an eye on the spread of prickly acacia following massive floods. Photo: DAF

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'Mongrel weeds' could be spread to new areas by vast flood waters.

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Land holders in waterlogged western and north western Queensland are being urged to watch out for invasive weeds in the wake of devastating floods. 

Invasive Species Council science advisor Tim Low said conditions were ideal for the spread of weeds such as prickly acacia. 

"Weeds like prickly acacia and parkinsonia have seeds that can last for decades in some cases," Mr Low said. 

"They are waiting for super wet years. Prickly acacia pods can float for 30 days and they can be carried on these vast sheets of water to places they've never been seen before."

Mr Low said black soil areas and fertile flood plains would be particularly prone to weed infestations. 

He said Biosecurity Queensland needed to work with producers, who were in many cases still dealing with the aftermath of the floods, in order to stay on top of the problem. 

"The future productivity of the landscape is at stake. These are mongrel weeds."

LNP agriculture spokesman Tony Perrett said additional support would be needed to help landholders. 

"Flood affected landholders in north west Queensland have a long road to recovery," he said.  

"A road that unfortunately includes a likely resurgent and rampant pest and weed crisis of the likes normally seen after large natural disasters like floods.

“Given the scale of the flooding in the north west the Liberal National Party is calling on additional support from Biosecurity Queensland to landholders to assist them with influx of pest and weed management required." 

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