Qld resources sector backs drought affected farmers

Drought support: Resources sector backs Qld farmers

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DROUGHT ASSISTANCE: Queensland's resources sector has backed drought affected farming communities, contributing more than $800,000 in financial support.

DROUGHT ASSISTANCE: Queensland's resources sector has backed drought affected farming communities, contributing more than $800,000 in financial support.

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Queensland's resources sector has backed drought affected farming communities, contributing more than $800,000 in financial support.

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QUEENSLAND’s resources sector has backed drought affected farming communities, contributing more than $800,000 to several drought relief organisations.

Queensland Resources Council chief executive Ian Macfarlane said all droughts cause extreme hardship on farmers, which could last for many years.

“As a former farmer I know how devasting a drought is to people’s livelihoods and the pain has a lasting impact on regional communities including local shops and suppliers,” Mr Macfarlane said.

Hasting Deerings was one the companies assisting drought affected farmers, contributing $10,000 to Buy-a-Bale.

Hasting Deerings was one the companies assisting drought affected farmers, contributing $10,000 to Buy-a-Bale.

“As two primary industries, resources and agriculture have a long and proud history of working together. The CSG industry has formed co-existence agreements with landholders delivering around $400 million in payments.”

Agricultural Industry Development Minister Mark Furner said contributions from the resources sector had made a tangible difference to producers during the drought.

“These generous donations have a bigger impact than you might think, because when our farmers are supported the communities where they employ people also do better,” Mr Furner said.

Businesses in the resources sector have certainly led the way, and it’s not too late for other businesses to follow their example and support the Queensland Drought Appeal. - Mark Furner, Agricultural Industry Development Minister

“Businesses in the resources sector have certainly led the way, and it’s not too late for other businesses to follow their example and support the Queensland Drought Appeal.”

Mr Macfarlane said the resources sector has also played its part by building infrastructure which farmers use to service their farms and farmers have swapped the Akubra for a hard hat to work in mines delivering skills to the sector.

“It’s important for the resources sector to help out regional communities with many of our own projects operating nearby,” Mr Macfarlane said

“The largest combined donation of more than half a million ($507,500) was given to the Queensland Drought Appeal which was passed onto the Queensland Country Women’s Association.”

The Queensland Drought Appeal was launched by the Queensland Government with an initial $100,000 contribution from the government in August.

Full list of contributions:

- Origin Energy: $100,000 to Drought Angels plus $57,500 in matched employee donations (through the Origin Foundation) to Rural Aid's Buy a Bale campaign.

- Santos: $129,500 - $75,000 Drought Appeal plus $41,000 from cattle sale proceeds $13,500 matched staff donations.

- Shell: $117,000 Drought Appeal ($17,000 matched staff donations).

- Adani Australia $111,000.

- Rio Tinto: $100,000 Drought Appeal.

- New Hope: $50,000 to Aussie Helpers.

- QAL: $35,000 worth of hay to Rural Aid.

- Idemitsu Australia and Ensham Resources $20,000 drought appeal.

- South32: $20,000 Drought Appeal.

- Evolution: $15,000 (plus $1500 fuel to local transport provider to deliver hay).

- Peabody: $12,000 ($5000 Aussie Helpers, $5000 Buy a Bale, $2000 drought relief fundraiser).

- Arrow Energy: $10,000 towards feed for livestock and $2200 Drought Angels.

- APLNG: $10,000 Drought Appeal.

- Hasting Deerings: $10,000 to Buy-a-Bale (split $5000 in matched employee donations).

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