LNP targets Palaszczuk’s ‘anti-farming’ laws

Palaszczuk’s ‘anti-farming’ laws in LNP's sights

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FIGHTING BACK: LNP opposition Natural Resource Management spokesman Dale Last will move a disallowance motion in parliament this week.

FIGHTING BACK: LNP opposition Natural Resource Management spokesman Dale Last will move a disallowance motion in parliament this week.

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LNP MPs are opposing so-called 'anti-farming' laws, saying they make it harder to feed livestock during drought.

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LIBERAL National Party MPs are targeting controversial vegetation management laws introduced by the Palaszczuk government, saying they make it harder for farmers to feed their cattle and sheep during drought.

LNP opposition Natural Resource Management spokesman Dale Last said he would move a disallowance motion in parliament this week to block the introduction of regulations that limit Queensland farmer’s ability to feed their livestock.

“The LNP is listening to those hurting most from this devastating and prolonged drought and this is why we are taking action,” Mr Last said.

“We are hearing loud and clear that Queenslanders want to support our farmers in drought, and the last thing our farmers need is more bureaucratic red tape.

“Labor’s anti-farming laws are doing the opposite in making this drought bite even harder for farmers who are just trying to survive.”

The tightening of the fodder harvesting code and the removal of the thinning code have meant more red tape for farmers to navigate and have made it harder to grow grass to feed livestock. - Grant Maudsley, AgForce

AgForce president Grant Maudsley said there was no doubt the Queensland Government’s vegetation management laws were making it harder for farmers to do their jobs

“And that’s the last thing they needed in drought,” Mr Maudsley said.

“The tightening of the fodder harvesting code and the removal of the thinning code have meant more red tape for farmers to navigate and have made it harder to grow grass to feed livestock.

“That represents a gross misunderstanding of sound land management principles and costs producers time and money when they are already under financial and emotional pressure due to drought.

“AgForce continues to urge the Queensland Government to rethink their harsh and unnecessary laws, and instead develop a long term solution that delivers good outcomes for both primary producers and the environment.”

Mr Last said in drought affected parts of Queensland farmers used mulga as an emergency and last resort feed for their drought affected herds.

“Mulga is a shrub or small tree that is found in vast quantities throughout Queensland,” Mr Last said.

“It’s designed to survive in the outback with its leaves growing back quickly after sheep and cattle use them for feed.

“This plant is a lifeline in outback Queensland and that is why it is essential that farmers maintain access to these mulga trees for emergency fodder and feed.”

Mr Last said Labor’s ‘anti-farming’ laws made this process more difficult and was putting the welfare of cattle and sheep in jeopardy.

“During drought government has two roles; the first is to directly support farmers, the other is getting out of the way and letting our farmers do what they do best – survive these droughts by being the efficient and effective professionals they are,” Mr Last said.

“It’s time for Labor to stop putting politics before people and scrap their anti-farming laws and support our fellow Queensland farmers through this drought.”

RELATED STORY: ‘Palaszczuk delivers new anti-farmer vegetation laws’.

RELATED STORY: ‘New tree laws ‘good for Qld’ says Lynham’.

RELATED STORY: ‘QLD Food Future group release vegetation management film, A True Story: From The Heart of Queensland’.

RELATED STORY: ‘Farmers demand new vegetation laws be halted’.

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