Roselea wool comes up roses

Ekka 2018: Peter and Linder Hacker take fleece championship by half a point


Ekka 2018 News
Wool champions: Peter and Linda Hacker, Roselea, Muckadilla, with their prize-winning ram's fleece, part of the eye-catching Ekka display. Picture: Sally Cripps.

Wool champions: Peter and Linda Hacker, Roselea, Muckadilla, with their prize-winning ram's fleece, part of the eye-catching Ekka display. Picture: Sally Cripps.

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Western Maranoa stud Merino breeders, Peter and Linda Hacker, have fleeced their opposition in the Royal Queensland Show wool competition.

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Western Maranoa stud Merino breeders, Peter and Linda Hacker, have fleeced their opposition in the Royal Queensland Show wool competition, taking the TC Hacker Memorial and Lendlease Merino stud ram’s fleece trophies on the way to becoming grand champion Merino fleece of the show.

The Bredhauer family at Lambert, Charleville showed the champion Queensland-grown fleece, while Walcha, NSW superfine breeder, Michael Sweeney from Tallara, had the grand champion flock fleece of the show.

Mr Sweeney is a well-known show winner around NSW and the Sydney Royal Show with his fleeces.

The Brumpton family at Mt Ascot, Mitchell took all three placings in the stud ewe’s fleece competition.

The winning Roselea fleece was from a ram that won the champion fine wool poll ram award at the 2017 State Sheep Show at Charleville.

Weighing 9.5kg, the 19.3 micron fleece pipped Will and Narda Roberts’ Victoria Downs fleece by half a point.

Related reading: Roberts rates sheep showing

Since returning to the Ekka exhibiting arena three years ago after a 25 year break, Roselea hasn’t been out of the winner’s circle, claiming the grand championship and reserve in 2016, the reserve in 2017, and the championship again in 2018.

“I’ve always concentrated on soft, well-marked wool and cutting ability,” Peter said. “Bruce Lines encouraged me to support the RNA, which is the elite competition in Queensland for wool.”

This year’s display featured 86 fleeces, which was down a little from the previous year and consisted largely of exhibits collected from shows in the state’s south west.

Longreach’s Paul Grams brought down a champion central west fleece from Hazelwood at Isisford, which took out the medium wool class.

Related reading: Longreach Show wool winner

Although they were drought-affected, most fleeces were still holding their weight.

They were judged by Robert Ellis, Rodwells, Melbourne, who was surprised to see them holding their character and handle.

“The dry has affected the lambing more than the wool,” steward, Bruce Lines, explained. “They’re still sound fleeces, and a lot of people have commented on how white they are.”

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