Tractor industry of the future

Tractor industry of the future


On Farm
POWERING ON: Chairman of the Tractor and Machinery Association (TMA), Landpower, general manager, Paul Barry welcomed the 150 strong crowd to the annual conference, themed "thriving in the face of disruption'.

POWERING ON: Chairman of the Tractor and Machinery Association (TMA), Landpower, general manager, Paul Barry welcomed the 150 strong crowd to the annual conference, themed "thriving in the face of disruption'.

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New players and old enemies have the ability to disrupt the traditional tractor and machinery paradigm.

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NEW PLAYERS and old enemies have the ability to disrupt the traditional tractor and machinery paradigm. 

At the Tractor and Machinery Association (TMA) annual conference, TMA chairman and Landpower, general manager, Paul Barry said industry did not want to play Blockbuster Video to the emerging technology’s Netflix.

About 150 attendees from the machinery industry and dealers attended the conference, held in Sydney, to listen to speakers present on the theme “thriving in the face of disruption”.

Mr Barry said the video rental chains had been caught unaware by disruptor and entertainment juggernaut, Netflix. 

“A disruptor is someone who can see a new proposition in the market, that can either deliver distinctive value or do something that has already been done, but do it better,” he said. 

Mr Barry said the industry also had to consider more traditional disruption sources. 

“We are in the agriculture game, the weather is obviously a huge disruptor,” he said.

“The coming trade-war, we have already seen the effect of India putting a tariff on pulse crops. 

“And imagine the impact on the loss of roundup from no-till farming.”

Mr Barry said safety regulation could also be perceived as a source of disruption.

“Farms stand out as the most dangerous workplace in Australia,” he said.

“On average 41 people die on farm each year.

“Do you really think the regulators are going to stand by and do nothing.”

Mr Barry said despite disruption and disruptions coming in different forms, many of which could not be controlled, machinery manufacturers and dealers couldn’t keep their head down and hope for the best. 

“A word of warning, consider what your customers will do.

“Our customers are becoming more informed and more empowered.

“The world is also getting very small, the ability to roll out new technology is no longer hampered by the tyranny of distance.

“The biggest danger is going back to your business and doing nothing.”

Mr Barry said to tackle these issues the TMA had redefined it’s purpose to that of advancing the $2.5 billion Australian agricultural machinery industry.

“The TMA represents all those who make, import, sell and fix agricultural machinery in Australia,” he said. 

Mr Barry said underlying it’s purpose were three pillars, firstly promotion and development of industry, secondly safety and regulatory support, and thirdly to provide market intelligence to industry. ​

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