An Australian-made marvel

The Belmont Red: An Australian-made marvel


Business features
Belmont Australia association president Jeanne Seifert says graziers who are interested in breeding more, and breeding better beef, at a lower cost, for higher profits, buy the tropically adapted Belmont Red.

Belmont Australia association president Jeanne Seifert says graziers who are interested in breeding more, and breeding better beef, at a lower cost, for higher profits, buy the tropically adapted Belmont Red.

Aa

AS a sire breed, the Belmont Red holds an advantage over British, European and Bos Indicus breeds for use in crossbreeding, says Belmont Australia (BA) president Jeanne Seifert.

Aa

AS a sire breed, the Belmont Red holds an advantage over British, European and Bos Indicus breeds for use in crossbreeding, says Belmont Australia (BA) president Jeanne Seifert.

Genetically, the Africander component in the Belmont Red makes them different from all other tropical composite breeds based on the Brahman.

“Belmont Reds combine the production and beef quality traits of the British breeds, with the advantage of superior adaptation including tick and parasite resistance, heat tolerance and drought resistance, as well as calving ease and small birth weight calves, from their African heritage,” she said.

“Best of all Belmont Reds are proudly Australian-made, having been developed in Rockhampton specifically for northern conditions more than 50 years ago.”

Ms Seifert attended the recent MLA Breeding and Genetics Forum, and was pleased to hear about the National Livestock Genetics Consortiums goals.

She said “for five decades the Belmont Red breed, in one complete low-cost, high-return, package”, has proven to meet the goals of the Northern beef industry and MLA, which include:

  • Improving market specification compliance
  • Reducing costs
  • Increasing growth rates
  • Improving fertility
  • Livestock production efficiency to drive overall industry prosperity.

She said “outdated perceptions” of how the Belmont Red breed looked when it was first released to the industry, have limited the breeds acceptance by some graziers. 

“If they looked again now I bet they’d be pleasantly surprised.  More importantly, beef producers who’re interested in genuinely hardy cattle for northern conditions, that breed more, and produce better beef, at a lower cost, for higher profits, are investing in Belmont Reds.”

Ms Seifert said she feels honoured to have the support of an outstanding, motivated and smart committee on the BA council.

“Our vision is to grow the commercial profile and adoption of the breed.”

This ambition was bolstered in 2017 when BA held the first society sale in decades, with the top-priced bull selling for $19,000.

Following its success, the second annual sale will be held on Tuesday July 17, at North Jandowae. The sale will be a Helmsman auction with online bidding available for the 50 semen-tested, registered, Breedplan-recorded Belmont Red bulls.

The day will open with two well-known guest speakers, and post-sale a complimentary lunch will be served with guests welcome to stay for drinks to wrap-up the day.

To learn more about the breed visit the Belmont Australia site C264 at Beef 2018, and visit the website belmontred.com.au.   

Aa

From the front page

Sponsored by