Chopper pilots fly food to stranded flood victims | Video

AgForce and chopper pilots visit stranded flood victims in St Lawrence and Lotus Creek


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Ben Hutton, Hugh Banks and Russell Pitt were just some of the pilots who helped fly goods to stranded people. Picture: Sharon Howard

Ben Hutton, Hugh Banks and Russell Pitt were just some of the pilots who helped fly goods to stranded people. Picture: Sharon Howard

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As the flood focus turns to Rockhampton, a group of chopper pilots spent their Saturday providing aid to the people left in the aftermath.

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A GROUP of chopper pilots in central Queensland spent their weekend flying supplies to stranded residents around the Isaac Region in the aftermath of ex Tropical Cyclone Debbie.

With all eyes on the pending flood situation in Rockhampton and evacuations in northern New South Wales, those left in the the trail of destruction around St Lawrence, Lotus Creek and Clarke Creek thought they had been forgotten.

After receiving Facebook messages about the need for assistance, AgForce’s Sharon Howard and Collin and Krystal Beath began organising supplies and helicopters to access the areas.

AgForce Central Regional Manager Sharon Howard said the damage was heartbreaking.

“We went to Daecey (near St Lawrence) and there was a couple there and their 31-year-old son and they got hammered and spent the night on the kitchen table...the dogs drowned on the chain because they couldn’t get to them, the horses and cattle washed past them,” she said.

“When we arrived they were still shell shocked, they were completely lost.

“They didn’t know what day it was, what they had to do and where to start. We did a lot of cuddling and crying.

Graham Clements, Leonie Stanley and Cody Clements were forced to spend the night on their kitchen table as flood waters entered their home.

Graham Clements, Leonie Stanley and Cody Clements were forced to spend the night on their kitchen table as flood waters entered their home.

“It was more than the food, they were just going, ‘Oh my goodness, someone knows we are here’.”

Action Helicopters owner Cody Ford provided his helicopters for the fly overs and said it was the Australian thing to do.

Pilot Russell Pitt said a lot of people were just happy to see visitors.

“Some places were fine and you would fly along and drop in on some people and it wasn't hard to see they were doing fine,” he said.

“Even if they have lost stock at least their buildings didn't go under and they had a generator on.

“There were some people who were in the dumps a bit.

“In all honesty, we knew there was some trouble but unless you are from the area and going there you wouldn't know.”

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