Canada hears about clusters

International audience for wild dog fencing ideas

Livestock
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South West Natural Resource Management’s work on cluster fencing was presented to people from across the globe at the tenth International Rangelands Congress in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan in Canada in late July.

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Catherine Crowden and Mary-Anne Healy at the Saskatchewan rangelands conference.

Catherine Crowden and Mary-Anne Healy at the Saskatchewan rangelands conference.

South West Natural Resource Management’s work on cluster fencing was presented to people from across the globe at the tenth International Rangelands Congress in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan in Canada in late July.

Former CEO Mary-Anne Healy and current Collaborative Area Management project officer Catherine Crowden were amongst over 500 attendees from around the world at the conference, including Mongolia, Brazil, New Zealand, Kenya and many other countries.

SW NRM chair Mark O’Brien said it had been exciting to have the group’s work on cluster fencing presented to an international audience.

“It is such a privilege to have a paper accepted for presentation at a conference of this calibre,” he said.

“At the same time our representatives got to be exposed to other ideas, issues and management tools being implemented around the world and are able to bring that information back to inform our work here.”

According to Ms Healy, there was an excellent Australian contingent present at the conference.

“There was a lot of interest in our work as well as work of the Rangeland NRM Alliance and the NRM Spatial Hub, both of which are working with South West NRM.”

Catherine Crowden presented an overview of cluster fencing, including a description of the impact of wild dogs on the sheep industry in western Queensland.

“I used some pretty graphic photos to demonstrate the heartache that landholders have been put through as stock is attacked by dogs,” she said.

“Attendees were very interested in both understanding the issue better, as well as the concept of clusters of land managers collaborating to protect and manage their stock.

“Some of the local Canadian ranchers were interested in the concept as they try and deal with coyotes and wolves.”

Mary-Anne Healy also presented a paper on her former work as a knowledge broker, facilitating researchers and NRM planners to work together across the Australian rangelands.

Some of the local Canadian ranchers were interested in the concept as they try and deal with coyotes and wolves. - Catherine Crowden

The Australian Rangelands Society conference will be held in Port Augusta, South Australia in September 2017.

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