Dolly’s Law could bring online ban for cyber bullies

Dolly's Law could ban cyber bullies from Facebook, Instagram use


News
Amy "Dolly" Everett had been the young face of Akubra hats as a girl.

Amy "Dolly" Everett had been the young face of Akubra hats as a girl.

Aa

Dolly Everett's father said her life "will not be wasted" if it could stop the suffering of others.

Aa

THE death of Northern Territory girl Amy “Dolly” Everett earlier this year has triggered calls for a social media ban for cyber-bullies.

News the 14-year-old took her own life caused a national outpouring of grief and caused anti-bullying groups to join forces in lobbying governments to create change.

The groups, including the Carly Ryan Foundation, are calling for a law – Dolly’s Law – to ban young people from social media, similar to a physical Apprehended Violence Order.

Following his daughter’s death, Tick Everett said on Facebook that Dolly's life "will not be wasted" if it could stop the suffering of others.

And, it seems the wheels are in motion to bring change on an international issue.

Statistics from Beyond Blue, show the number of deaths by suicide in young Australians is the highest it has been in 10 years.

With the growing use of social media over the past decade, children have found bullying follows them, even when they leave the school grounds.

Dolly had been the young face of Akubra Hats and her death put the issue of bullying back on the national agenda.

Akubra posted this statement after her passing:

"To think that anyone could feel so overwhelmed and that this was their only option is unfathomable," they wrote.

"Bullying of any type is unacceptable. It is up to us to stand up when we see any kind of bullying behaviour.

"Our hearts go out to her family and friends."

In addition to a cyber ban, the Carly Foundation is calling for increased education on the issue. The foundation is a non-profit charity created to promote internet safety.

Read more:

If you or anyone you know needs help, contact Lifeline on 13 11 14, Kids Helpline on 1800 551 800, or Beyond Blue on 1300 22 46 36.

Aa

From the front page

Sponsored by