Kindon cluster fence stops pest movement

Southern Queensland landholders join the cluster fence movement


The 25km-long Kindon cluster fence joins the existing Queensland Wild Dog Barrier Fence to enclose 28,000 hectares of mixed cattle and cropping land.

The 25km-long Kindon cluster fence joins the existing Queensland Wild Dog Barrier Fence to enclose 28,000 hectares of mixed cattle and cropping land.

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Five Goondiwinid landholders have completed 25km of exclusion fencing.

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Landholders in the Goondiwindi region have put in 25 kilometres of exclusion fence to create a cluster of five properties.

The new fence joins the existing Queensland Wild Dog Barrier Fence to enclose 28,000 hectares of mixed cattle and cropping land. 

The Killen family’s Bangalow, Goondiwindi, is one of the five properties enclosed by the cluster, and Tony Killen said the decision to put up the fence was to protect their country from wild dogs and wildlife. 

The Killens run 1000 head of breeder cattle and Mr Killen said though their cattle hadn’t been bothered by wild dogs yet, they moved out of sheep because of dingo problems.

In the several months since the fence was completed, Mr Killen said there hadn’t yet been any noticeable results.

“We’ve stopped the movement, hopefully long term we are going to cut the numbers down,” he said.

The cost of the fence was made up of $185,500 put in by the five members and $56,330 from the Queensland Feral Pest Initiative. 

Mr Killen said it was an expensive outlay for all involved, but hoped there would be a good result long term.

The cluster also includes Noel and Liz Cook’s Dinna Dalbi and Kindon, Scott and Libby Glasser’s Goondimerri, Berny and Tanya Doyle’s Bungaringa, and Rob and Annabelle Grieve’s Bundaleer.

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