Shorthorns deliver Brisbane’s best steak

Thousand Guineas: Shorthorns deliver Brisbane’s best steak


WINNER: The Shorthorn breed has again delivered the best steak in Brisbane.

WINNER: The Shorthorn breed has again delivered the best steak in Brisbane.

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The Shorthorn breed has again delivered Brisbane’s best steak.

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THE Shorthorn breed’s flagship brand Thousand Guineas produced by JBS has again delivered the most popular steak in Brisbane.

The 120 day grainfed marble score 2-plus sirloin was lined up against steaks from three other breeds – Charbray, Hereford and Droughtmaster – at the Norman Hotel in inner-city Woolloongabba. 

The winner was judged to be the steak that achieved the highest level of sales during October. The reward for the winner is the steak remains on the menu for all of November. 

A score sheet is also supplied with each steak, enabling diners to rank various eating attributes and encourage discussion.  

Norman Hotel manager Andrew Ford, Norman Hotel executive chef Frank Correnti, and Denis Conroy, JBS, with the winning Shorthorn Thousand Guineas sirloin.

Norman Hotel manager Andrew Ford, Norman Hotel executive chef Frank Correnti, and Denis Conroy, JBS, with the winning Shorthorn Thousand Guineas sirloin.

The Shorthorn steak came in just one point ahead of the Charbray selection and the Hereford and Droughtmaster offerings.

Graham Winnell from Shorthorn Beef said the consistency of the product was maintained by strict adherence to the genetic integrity of cattle supplied into the program.

“The cattle must be at least 75 per cent Shorthorn and can only include genetics from other British breeds,” Mr Winnell said.  

The Thousand Guineas offering at the Norman Hotel in Woolloongabba.

The Thousand Guineas offering at the Norman Hotel in Woolloongabba.

Denis Conroy from JBS said the premium product was primarily being sold to Australian restaurants and into Japan.  

“We’re very big supporters of this competition at the Norman,” Mr Conroy said. “It provides us with consumer feedback that helps us better understand what is being being experienced on the dinner plate.”

JBS processes 240-300 head of Shorthorn cattle a week specifically for the Thousand Guineas brand.

Godfrey Morgan, The Grove Shorthorns, Condamine, Norman Hotel manager Andrew Ford, Graham Winnell, Shorthorn Beef, Norman Hotel executive chef Frank Correnti, and David Spencer, Beef Shorthorn Society.

Godfrey Morgan, The Grove Shorthorns, Condamine, Norman Hotel manager Andrew Ford, Graham Winnell, Shorthorn Beef, Norman Hotel executive chef Frank Correnti, and David Spencer, Beef Shorthorn Society.

JBS marketing executive Brad De Luca said the niche brand was a salute to the long history of the Shorthorn breed and the price paid in Britain for the Shorthorn bull Comet in 1810.

“It is a relatively new brand but it captures the history and the outstanding eating quality of the breed,” Mr De Luca said.

“A big part of why the brand is a success is because the Shorthorn Society is committed to making the product a success and are very engaged in the process.

“We are always working to maximise the value of a product for every participant along the supply chain. When we can maximise values we can ultimately pay more to producers and ensure the sustainable supply of cattle.”

Norman Hotel manager Andrew Ford said the breed challenge was one of the restaurants most popular promotions.

“It gives us a point of difference and a good conversation starter with people coming through the door,” Mr Ford said.

“People come to the Norman expecting a great eating experience. Steak like this is helping keep us one jump ahead of the competition.”

The Thousand Guineas sirloin is on the Norman Hotel menu for $36.90. 

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