Counting the cost: CQ, Burnett flood damage

CQ, Burnett flood damage assessment underway

COUNTING THE COST: DAF staff are assessing the impact of flooding and heavy rain on crops and infrastructure.

COUNTING THE COST: DAF staff are assessing the impact of flooding and heavy rain on crops and infrastructure.

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DAF staff are assessing the impact of flooding and heavy rain on crops and infrastructure.

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AN assessment of the damage to agricultural production in Central Queensland and the Burnett caused by floods and recent heavy rain is underway.

Acting Agriculture Minister Anthony Lynham said DAF staff were meeting with farmers on their properties to assess the impact on crops and infrastructure.

“It is important that our people get out on the ground to gather accurate information so we can determine the most appropriate assistance for producers,” Dr Lynham said.

Where the rain fell in the past week. - www.bom.gov.au

Where the rain fell in the past week. - www.bom.gov.au

“We know heavy falls have caused localised flooding in the Bundaberg, Gladstone and North Burnett regional council areas in particular.

“Significant damage has been reported to vegetable and grain crops just prior to harvest in those areas where the rain has been heaviest.

“The scale of the rainfall is also expected to delay harvesting in some areas.”

Dr Lynham said while some producers were counting the cost of too much rain, the downfalls would be generally welcomed throughout a state suffering a prolonged and debilitating drought.

Queensland's drought affected areas. - www.longpaddock.qld.gov.au

Queensland's drought affected areas. - www.longpaddock.qld.gov.au

“Just over 66 per cent of Queensland remains drought-declared and some areas are in their fourth or fifth year of drought so this rain is making many cattle producers very happy,” he said.

“It is far too early to consider the long-term impacts on pasture growth in those areas which are worst affected by the drought, but these rains will at least fill dams on properties and soak the earth.”

Local drought committees will monitor falls throughout the summer and pasture growth before recommending any changes to drought declarations and revocations in April 2018.

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