Stolen weapons among firearms handed in

Gun amnesty turns in a variety of weapons

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Dozens of firearms previously reported stolen are among the weapons surrendered in Queensland under the national firearm amnesty.

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Dozens of firearms previously reported stolen are among the weapons surrendered in Queensland under the national firearm amnesty.

Another 1618 of the 5252 firearms so far processed by police were unregistered.

A police spokeswoman said another 2529 weapons had been handed in but were yet to be processed.

The three-month amnesty, which ends on September 30, has provided people with an opportunity to legally dispose of or register a firearm without penalty.

Police Minister Mark Ryan said during the first two months of the amnesty, 26 firearms had been handed in that had previously been reported stolen.

“That is a significant number of firearms and the State Crime Command is now conducting further inquiries into those stolen weapons,” Mr Ryan said.

“We cannot emphasise enough how important it is for registered firearm owners to secure their weapons to prevent them being stolen and used for illegal purposes.

“We acknowledge that the vast majority of firearm owners in Queensland are responsible but it only takes one mistake for a gun to fall into the wrong hands and for a tragedy to happen.”

The national firearms amnesty is a result of COAG’s Law, Crime and Community Safety Council meeting last year, which agreed to a number of measures to deal with illegal firearms.

One of the more unusual firearms surrendered was a pocket revolver handed in to the Fortitude Valley Police Station by an older gentleman who said it belonged to his grandfather.

The pocket revolver handed in to the Fortitude Valley police station. Photo supplied.

The pocket revolver handed in to the Fortitude Valley police station. Photo supplied.

“The gentleman said he wasn’t really a gun person and wanted to hand it in so that it could possibly be forwarded to a museum,” Minister Ryan said.

“One of our officers did some research and it appears it is a 7mm pin file action two shot revolver that may have been made in Belgium between 1860 and 1890.

“It is an interesting piece and I want to thank that gentleman for doing the right thing and handing it in.”

The majority of the firearms surrendered are category A, or air rifles, rim-fire rifles and shotguns.

The next greatest number surrendered are category B weapons, single shot and double barrel centre-fire rifles, repeating centre-fire rifles, and break action shotgun and centre-fire rifle combinations.

Handguns, category H are the next highest number – 233 have been brought in.

Some 190 semi-automatic rifles and semi-automatic shotguns and pump-action shotguns with a magazine no greater than five rounds, or category C, have been surrendered.

Category D weapons, self-loading centre-fire rifles and shotguns with a capacity for more than five rounds, are represented much less in the Queensland amnesty, with 74 handed in.

Category M weapons are items such as crossbows, knuckledusters incendiary devices, such as flamethrowers designed for vegetation management, and switchblade knives, while bulletproof vests and body armour make up category E.

Twenty-seven items in this category have been surrendered.

Just five items in category R, machine guns, hand grenades, silencers and rocket launchers, have been handed in.

Anyone wanting to surrender a firearm has until September 30, preferably at their local firearms dealer, rather than a police station.

A person may attend a police station only where it is impractical to attend a local firearms dealer and only after first contacting that police station to make an appointment.

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