Caught on camera

Got ya!


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Remote sensing cameras in the upper reaches of the Guy Fawkes River, close to Ebor, have captured a rare encounter between native Quoll and the good ol' Aussie Wedge Tailed eagle.

Remote sensing cameras in the upper reaches of the Guy Fawkes River, close to Ebor, have captured a rare encounter between native Quoll and the good ol' Aussie Wedge Tailed eagle.

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Researchers working in the upper Guy Fawkes catchment were lucky enough to capture a rare moment between Australian native wildlife.

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Remote sensing cameras in the upper reaches of the Guy Fawkes River, close to Ebor, have captured a rare encounter between native Quoll and a Wedge Tailed eagle.

The remarkable photograph, triggered by movement, remotely, without human presence, illustrates the driving force behind wild dog research – that desire to know what really goes on in the bush, and whether our iconic Aussie species still roam free.

The great Eastern Fall, where the New England tablelands slip steeply towards the coast, is home to a rare wilderness, where quolls argue with eagles.

The great Eastern Fall, where the New England tablelands slip steeply towards the coast, is home to a rare wilderness, where quolls argue with eagles.

Program director Dr Guy Ballard, Department of Primary Industries, said the rare moment in time between argy-bargy species, each prepared to defend their turf, was one of a 13.5 million strong album of remotely triggered images designed to teach researchers about canine habits.

University staff and students comb through each sim card from dozens of strategically placed cameras, creating a carefully documented catalogue to further knowledge. 

In this case the pair are facing-off above a lure-cannister designed to attract predators into the view of the camera trap.

This photo was captured in the upper Guy Fawkes river catchment, which begins at Ebor and flows into the Clarence via the remote Boyd, Nymboida and Mann rivers.

By the way – the horizon was tilted because an Angus cross cow (yes it was photographed), part of a small herd that broke into the national park through the fence, bumped the camera mount forcing the lean. The cattle are back in their home paddock.

The story Caught on camera first appeared on The Land.

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