Windy Hill homestead a rural delight | Photos

Country Homes: Home built with timber, brass, bricks from Knockavanan house


HOME SWEET HOME: Neek and Robyn Morawitz sit on the rear stairs at their home at Windy Hill, Comet.

HOME SWEET HOME: Neek and Robyn Morawitz sit on the rear stairs at their home at Windy Hill, Comet.

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The Morawitz family welcomed up into their home at Windy Hill, Comet, which is rich with heritage.

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STEPPING into Neek and Robyn Morawitz’s home at Windy Hill, Comet, there is an immediate sense of family, light and warmth. 

With freshly baked bread resting on the counter and 15-year-old Clementine laying on the lounge room floor doing her homework, the beautiful simplicity of the home sings from every corner. 

The home was built in 2000 but quietly showcases years of heritage at every turn. 

The floorboards, bathroom vanities and kitchen are made from the wood taken from the old State Farm house at Knockavanan, Gindie, before the property was sold. 

Inside in the hallway sits a display filled with pieces from the original Knockavanan homestead, Gindie, which weren’t utilised.

The Knockavanan Government Research Station operated from 1898 until 1933, when the Donaldson family won it in a land ballot. 

It was in the mid-1960s when the property was sold to Bill Rundle, who then sold it shortly after to Carl and Gail Morawitz (Neek Morawitz’s parents) in 1972.  

Mrs Morawitz said the heritage was built into every aspect of the home. 

“Just prior to Neek’s parents selling Knockavanan, my Dad and my brother took the old house down; every piece of timber, all the doors and the bricks,” she said. 

“It was mostly Hoop Pine, and it has all been recycled into the features that we have here at home now.

“The fireplace, the floorboards, the kitchen, the vanities and the office were all put together from what we got from that old house.” 

The kitchen is a centrepiece of the home, with the beautiful brick fireplace above the oven the feature of the room.

The kitchen is a centrepiece of the home, with the beautiful brick fireplace above the oven the feature of the room.

Mr Morawitz added that using the old materials was a nod of respect to the old historical home. 

“It provides a bit of character from that old house, because if it hadn’t been removed and pulled apart, it would have been totally delapitaded by now, it’s just a nice way to preserve the Gindie farm house,” he said. 

The Morawitz family moved into the home at Windy Hill in December 2000, when Mrs Morawitz was eight months pregnant with Clementine. 

“We had been married for 10 years prior to building, so we had plenty of time to work on the design and what it was going to be like,” she said. 

Mr Morawitz said after living in small homes and dongas, they wanted to take their time to decide exactly what they wanted their home to be. 

With four daughters, space was a priority. 

“We were very fortunate to be able to pursue what we wanted and make it a reality,” Mr Morawitz said. 

A display on show at the home shows the history of the Knockavanan, Gindie, home.

A display on show at the home shows the history of the Knockavanan, Gindie, home.

While the lower level of the home boasts a stunning open-plan living design with floor to roof windows and simple furnishings, the upper level is an impressively large zone for the girls.  

Haddie, 21, Tabitha, 19, Avanell, 18, Clementine, 15, mostly still live at home – and with the upper level made up of a large room with four nooks, an ensuite and four wardrobes, the girls live communally – with no walls separating each of their individual spaces, which are beautifully decorated with each girl’s style. 

The Morawitz’s farm 3800ha over Windy Hill and Argoon, with irrigation, dryland cropping and cattle country. 

Mrs Morawitz said for her, it was important that the home was comfortable and inviting.

“Every bit of this house gets used,” she said. 

“Because it’s an open design, there’s always a bit of commotion which is lovely, it’s what we wanted.

“There’s nowhere you can go and watch a TV and it’ll be quiet, but that’s how we like it.” 

The garden is Mrs Morawitz’ favourite part of the house, with the stunning grounds her personal pride and joy. 

Meanwhile, Mr Morawitz said his favourite part of the home was definitely the kitchen. 

“That’s where the food is,” he said. 

“I like the open design and there’s always a bit of noise, which is mostly good.”

The house is surrounded by a wooden deck, with beautiful iron panels which Mr Morawitz made himself. 

WINDY HILL: Neek and Robyn Morawitz, Windy Hill and Argoon, Comet, stand on the deck which wraps around the beautiful homestead - complete with the dinner bell.

WINDY HILL: Neek and Robyn Morawitz, Windy Hill and Argoon, Comet, stand on the deck which wraps around the beautiful homestead - complete with the dinner bell.

“Neek built all the railings, on weekends he would put together a panel or two during the construction of the house,” Mrs Morawitz said.

“I thought it was going to be a quick job, but it certainly wasn’t,” Mr Morawitz added. 

With the large windows, neutral colours and high ceilings, Mrs Morawitz said the home is “beautiful, and forgiving”. 

“Our home is 17 year old now, but in our eyes it is aging gracefully, which I think is really nice,” she said

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